Superhero

Latest Articles

Film
71
TV
49
Marvel Superheroes and Villains
Film
45
Film
45
Film
45
TV
37
Film
16
Film
31
Film
27
Animation
13

Latest Topics

5

Boku no Hero Academia: The evolution of Superheroes

Boku no Hero Academia (BnHK) is an anime series that has been rising in popularity over the years in Japan as well as with the Western audience. Among the recent slew of movies and entertainment based around superheroes, Boku no Hero Academia is no different. This follows a current trend in the evolution and redesigning of superheroes’ past and present. There are various similarities and identifiable inspirations that the author of BnHK has taken to flesh his characters, and yet there is a unique charm to one of the series’ protagonists: All Might that carries forward to other characters in the series and makes it truly unique. All Might is very much the Superman of the series, and yet there is something about his character that makes him far more evolved and endearing than the big boy scout. How does this correlate to the current perspective and revision of the modern superhero?

    15
    Published

    The Superhero Origin. Why?

    Do you know the origin of how James Bond came to be a spy? Does it take away your enjoyment of the Bond films if you don’t? What about Indianna Jones? Movie after movie after movie, it’s still fun, they are like issues of a comic book series. Why does Hollywood insist on pummeling us with repeatedly telling us the origin of a superhero? Whether it’s 45 minutes of the "first" Spider-Man film, or a five minute recap to remind you (Batman vs Superman) before the next installment commences. Is it necessary? Can’t we just go into the next installment of the movie?

    • I agree. Origin stories lose the whole mystery. A good example is LOST where the final season explained how everyone got to the island and then proceeded to undermine the whole backstory with a finale that made everything out to be a dream. What a total waste of time and so disappointing. I definitely agree with you that I don't need an origin story. Familiarity breeds contempt! – Munjeera 4 years ago
      1
    • I personally love origin stories, if they're good and come out gradually. It's the same reason I love learning about an author after reading their work -- it often explains the actions and reactions of a character in a way that makes you want to read the story or watch the movie again and search for subtleties you may have missed in the character's various interactions throughout. – Cait 4 years ago
      2
    • I personally don't mind the background story as long as there are variations, of some aspect. If i were to go see two or 3 or etc. version of spider man movies and they all showed the same origin story then it would be pointless and i understand what you are saying then. Although by giving a back-round this also attracts the rest of the population that might not know all the facts about spiderman or etc. . – tranpreet 4 years ago
      2
    • It's a difficult question because on one hand fans want the film to be so faithful to the comics, the origin is necessary but on the other hand, it does take away a large chunk of the film which could have been used elsewhere to enhance the film further. Not having an origin could also confuse those who aren't familiar with the characters comic history. Depending on the character and context to the film, an origin should be explained in some way or another, whether it be ten minutes or even one simple line. – ajgreen94 4 years ago
      0
    • The origin of the superhero is interesting because it provides insight into the character's motives and drives. Knowing certain aspects that occurred before the individual reached this level allows the viewer to understand why they act the way they do and it does create a level of understanding and acceptance. The background of Batman is probably one of the most interesting; yet it does not have to be reiterated in every single franchise installment--this I agree with, 100%! I hope someone picks up this topic, especially with the upcoming onslaught of superhero films set to hit the big screen in the upcoming months. – danielle577 4 years ago
      2
    • In my opinion, an origin story, done well, brings a lot to a story because it shows you something about the hero's attitude to their status as hero. For Batman, understanding that he does what he does because of his parents' death throws light on what he's going through internally while he's out fighting bad guys. For Spiderman, seeing him first as a nerdy outcast brings a kind of humour to his sudden freedom when he becomes a superhero. All this brings vulnerability to the characters, which isn't easy to achieve in a genre when victory is mandatory and usually absolute. Interiority obviously isn't the main point of a superhero, but you've got to have some or the thing falls flat. For that, you basically have to reach into their past. – TKing 4 years ago
      2
    • I actually really love origin stories. In fact, you talking about how James Bond became a spy or how Indiana Jones became a treasure hunter really got my mind working. I don't think its necessary, but I think it's fun for audiences to realize why a character does what they do and feel a little more sympathy towards them. The same goes for villains, before I knew Harley Quinn's backstory, I didn't really have an opinion about her one way or another. Now that I do, I love her and think she's a super interesting character. – Jenae 4 years ago
      1
    • Ok, let's agree that an origin story is fun and interesting. I think 99% of the people by now know Spider-Man was bitten by a spider. The story is so well known. Spider-Man began in 1960's and ran monthly ongoing to the present with over 1,000 issues to his name. Only ONE issue contained his origin. (And that was in another title). We had 45 min origin in the 2002 movie, we had another 45 min origin in the 2012 movie. We wait so long for a movie to come out, do we really need another 45 min origin story in 2017 when there is sooo much to be told that hasn't. – DrTestani 4 years ago
      1
    • This depends on how the creator wants to the story of that character to be played out. Origin stories are good in order to see how the character came to be and why. Some origins stories can come in the beginning, like how Peter Parker became Spider-Man, or in the middle of the plot, like how Marinette and Adrien became Ladybug and Cat Noir in Miraculous Ladybug. Sometimes, there is no origin story and that is what makes it interesting; it makes the audience guess and look for answers on that specific character. Origin stories are what help make the entire story plot come together, as long as it makes sense. A good plot makes a good origin story. – Sagemaster1 4 years ago
      1
    • Any discussion of this topic needs to reference this article: http://www.npr.org/sections/monkeysee/2017/07/11/536508517/origin-al-sin-what-hollywood-must-learn-from-spider-man-homecoming – derBruderspielt 3 years ago
      0
    • Isn't the origin story part of the whole superhero story formula? For many superheroes, it's the explanation of how the human crosses some sort of line, enters a new realm, becomes the superhuman. I agree that the origin story needs to be creatively retold every time it's told, but I'm all for keeping it in the superhero story formula. – JamesBKelley 3 years ago
      1
    2

    Are superhero movies overdone?

    It seems we can’t go a week without another superhero movie being announced or the latest comic book adaption coming to life. I understand it’s profitable and popular, but is anyone else excited for film projects outside of the Marvel/DC universe? What movies are you excited for? Or, if you absolutely adore superheroes, what are you looking forward to (beside the Deadpool movie)?

    • I like going to a movie about once every month, if not more. And so even though I'll admit I'm losing excitement for the next super-hero movie each time one is on the horizon, I have no intention to stop attending each that comes unless there's a particular one I really don't care for. I can say for certain that I am anticipating "Guardians of the Galaxy 2," because up until now that was the coolest movie I've seen besides "Star Trek: Into Darkness." I'm looking forward to "Batman V. Superman." I'm hoping "Captain America: Civil War" will be a stronger and more engaging film than "Age of Ultron." And I'm extremely curious about the "Doctor Strange" movie. Beyond those, though, I'll be more interested in seeing all the new Star Wars content, most especially "Rogue One," after "The Force Awakens" of course. – Jonathan Leiter 5 years ago
      0
    • I don't think so much 'overdone' as lacking in variety, so as to say the domination of Marvel has rendered many of its sequels upon sequels carbon copies of one another. Which is why 'Guardians of the Galaxy' was such a great fresh breath of air. – CalvinLaw 5 years ago
      0
    • I think the reason there are so many superhero movies right now is that, in this day and age and instability, we like to see people with superpowers able to handle that danger, even if we can't do it ourselves. We all see ourselves as heroes.I think that if writers/producers/directors/etc don't get their act together the genre CAN be overdone, but I also think there are infinite ways to portray heroes and their struggles. Personally, I'm not tired of them at all. (Civil War makes me both intensely worried and very excited. I really love Captain America.) – Winterling 5 years ago
      0
    • There are quite a good sum of movies that I take great personal interest in. I love superhero movies and although they are without a doubt some of the most popular films to arrive in decades, but I don't think that they impose upon other projects. Personally, I am intrigued by the recent success of The Peanuts movie and desire to see how Schulz's timeless characters transferred to the big screen, also Spectre, The Good Dinosuar, Creed, and of course, Star Wars episode 7. I think that movies are such an incredible medium and there really is a lot to be excited for in terms of upcoming projects both superhero related and non superhero related. So to answer your main question, perhaps superhero movies are overdone a little bit but that doesn't prevent them from being good or ruining other movies in my honest opinion. – BlakeZamora 5 years ago
      0
    • Superhero movies have always been present in cinema. If I had to say so, I'd say they'll always be present - or at least for a substantial amount of time. The only real reason people are stopping to ask if superhero movies are overdone is because of the recent incredible success that superhero movies are experiencing at the box office. Iron Man, The Avengers, and Guardians of the Galaxy are all examples of successful films at the box office. It's very possible that people are trying to capitalize on that, because it's relatively easy. You have these characters (whose personalities and designs are already created) and plots that have been fully played out in comics. It makes sense to go after superhero movies if you have the resources but lack the creativity or the drive to create your own characters and plot, and that could be where a lot of these movies are coming from. Are a lot of these coming out of major studios? Yes. Are they from major directors and production studios? Probably, but it seems like easy money because it's the in thing to make, and the consumers think it's in. – John 5 years ago
      0
    • Many of the overall tones, plot arcs and points are reused; but this over usage can be found in any genre, not just when it comes to super hero movies. I think there's a large outcry for variety, things that 'Guardians of The Galaxy" bring and 'Deadpool' promises to have. – KatieLouise 5 years ago
      0
    • A unique approach to this topic would also be to examine the difference between superheros and "real" heroes. Recently, movies such as American Sniper, Bridge of Spies, and the upcoming The Finest Hours all celebrate real mean committing acts of heroism for their country. While the heroes of the the Marvel movies are usually credited with "saving the world," these stories still invariably take place in the U.S. or are an immediate threat to the American way of life (first Captain America movie). In what ways do the similarities and differences between these two types of film commentate on American patriotism, idealism, and our ideas around the whole construct of what a hero is. – arharrison 5 years ago
      1
    • I think superhero movies are most certainly overdone however I enjoy the the fact that there are now consequences to every action that takes place in these different universes. – UnDeRsCoRe 5 years ago
      0
    • I do love the superhero films. I have never read any of the comics, but I try to catch most of the movies. Arharrison brings up an interesting point above. The comparison of real life heroes to superheroes. I wonder if the superhero films provide an example or a way of thinking about power, justice, etc that we can learn from and apply to the way we think and act as human beings and citizens. – joshuadistel 5 years ago
      0