ees

ees

I am interested in exploring ties between manga/anime and philosophical thought.

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    Latest Articles

    Latest Topics

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    Portrayals of Female Sexuality in Boruto Next Generations

    After Naruto ended, it didn’t take long for a sequel- Boruto- to emerge from the woodwork. The manner in which Ukyo Kodachi and Mikio Ikemoto portray the women/girls in their creation is vastly different from Kishimoto stylistically; this can be seen in the way that they dress, the way they talk about boys, or just their behavior in general. Why the sudden need for the sexualization of young Kunoichi, and how does it differ from Kishimoto’s method of expressing femininity throughout the Naruto franchise?

    • In a nutshell, sexting is very pernicious for all the teen generation regardless of their ages and natures. Once a guy tastes sexting, it becomes an open habit that the teens find hard to overcome. Keep your teens away from social media, dating websites and apps and especially keep strict eyes on the cell phone usage of your children by monitoring them through monitoring applications. – Nicki Marie 2 weeks ago
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    • I haven't watched Boruto and I'm still finishing Naruto but the whole way through Naruto I've found the representation of women terribly underwhelming and in most cases disturbing. It'd be a good article to draw in readers by making a comparison between the two. "What's different, what's not, and what should change?" – Slaidey 2 weeks ago
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    Kanji: Lost in Translation

    For most avid manga-readers, there have been times when a joke has gone right over our heads, or it has seemed like a character is speaking repetitively. The main culprit of this is the way that Kanji resists interpretation. Research and analyze how Kanji’s inability to be interpreted in a way that is universally accessible has affected art and pop culture as it relates to universal cultural understanding.

    • An excellent topic suggestion so you have my approval. As one who is presently learning Japanese I can certainly attest to how difficult Kanji can be to interpret, let alone translate (I use the term 'translate' advisedly). A small suggestion - it might also be worth noting that there are some young Japanese who have problems with interpreting Kanji. – Amyus 4 weeks ago
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    Themes of violence in Psycho-Pass

    Gen Urobuchi’s Psycho-Pass exhibits varying themes of both implicit and explicit violence. I would be interested for the various kinds of violence depicted in Psycho-Pass to be explored: violence enacted by the government onto certain characters, violence inflicted by one character onto another, or even violence directed by a character onto themselves. Some thinkers that I have considered on my own when thinking about this topic are Hegel, Nietzsche, and Caillois.

    • It would also be interesting to see how different types of violence effects people and how that is reflected in the show. – LaRose 3 months ago
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    Latest Comments

    ees

    While I would not classify myself as a “young anime user”, I’ll agree you are correct that there are indeed “child friendly” anime out there. My argument, however, is not that all anime contains violence. Rather, my argument states that anime that is violent uses the violence for a specific purpose, as you can read above. Thanks!

    Violence in Anime: Helpful or a Hindrance?
    ees

    I’d agree with you that it is certainly up for debate what constitutes a “gore anime” or not. However, for my specific case, it was never my intention to classify it as a gore anime, rather an anime series that utilizes aspects of gore. Thanks for reading!

    Violence in Anime: Helpful or a Hindrance?
    ees

    I agree that anime is not a genre, it is an art form which may be partitioned out into different genres. I think that I tend to disagree with your last statement, however; assuming that I have read/interpreted your comment correctly, you are implying that the “repressive social structure” of Japan causes artists to lean toward a more “extreme subject matter”. However, while the focus of this article is anime, anime is not the only place where you will find violent themes similar to those discussed here. Nor is Japan the only place where animated shows like the ones discussed here are prevalent- I think these are important aspects to consider when making a blanket statement such as the one you put forth here!

    Violence in Anime: Helpful or a Hindrance?
    ees

    I highly recommend it! And it isn’t too long either, so it won’t take up too much of your time.

    Violence in Anime: Helpful or a Hindrance?
    ees

    I kept trying to comment on this but the site keeps logging me out whenever I try for whatever reason, so I will just do it this way… But, it depends on which movie you’re talking about- although Miyazaki does not often show violence, works such as Princess Mononoke and Nausicaa of the Valley of the Wind do have some depictions of violence!

    Violence in Anime: Helpful or a Hindrance?
    ees

    True, the manga is still continuing and a third(?) season of Tokyo Ghoul has just been announced! However, I don’t think this adversely effects their ability to be analyzed in this way. I enjoy Dolly Kill Kill, but was trying to focus not only on series with which more people would be familiar, but also ones that had been released as anime. Thank you for reading!

    Violence in Anime: Helpful or a Hindrance?
    ees

    If Tokyo Ghoul appealed to you then I’d highly suggest Deadman Wonderland! If you aren’t averse to reading manga, too, I’d strongly recommend Dolly Kill Kill! Both are extremely violent, and follow Tokyo Ghoul and Titan’s model of violence for the evolution of the hero character.

    Violence in Anime: Helpful or a Hindrance?
    ees

    Great article!

    I’m sure that many agree wholeheartedly that the whitewashing of Asian characters has been outrageous over the years. Additionally, I feel that (with Ghost in the Shell in particular) the white washing touches on even deeper issues. First of all cultural, in the sense that the concept of “the cyborg” in Western culture is vastly different from that of the Japanese- oftentimes one finds (in anime especially) that the “cyborg” character is an ally, whereas in Western cinema we have an obvious distrust of the cyborg. On top of that, Scarlett Johansson’s sexualization (through no fault of her own, I should mention) seems likely to dominate the narrative as opposed to what made the original Ghost in the Shell so interesting- that of exploring the sexuality (or lack there of) of a post-human subject.

    In addition to all of this, Johansson remarked that Motoko was “identity-less”, which shows a surprising lack of understanding for the character she is supposed to be portraying. On top of that, the directors I have read also claimed that the original was “too philosophical”, and so they chose to leave out a lot of the defining themes that made the original film so compelling.

    Whitewashing of Asian Characters in Hollywood Anime/Manga Adaptations