Topics: L:Freire

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To War is Human, To Relinquish Unlikely

The film cache of War World I, World War II, and Vietnam dramatizations are continual fodder for the curious and critic alike. The ancient battles of Europe and Asia have had their turn in front of the camera lens and the recent terrorism and rogue posturing leave no doubt that the theaters will draw revelers back in droves for the foreseeable future. Does the war formula of the past persist in terms of viewer expectation and recent innovation such as night vision? How does the ever changing geopolitical agenda and the socioeconomic appetite influence the confrontational depiction on the silver screen or the plasma screen? Does CGI enhance or devalue the tendency to transcend the dilemma physically, ideological or existentially? Consider the early stop motion techniques of Jason and the Argonauts (skeleton sword attack), War Games (teen hacker), The Hunt for Red October (espionage), or Terminator 2 (apocalyptic dream) for analysis of realism and suspension of disbelief in new battle fronts. Are psychological warfare or cyber-attacks in virtual space the future of wars, drone missions and stealth raids a nascent ploy, or is there still a place for the dog fights and tank ambushes of early combat?

  • Seems as though there are two different things going here: 1) Movies on war, meaning actual wars or probably well-known battles, and; 2) battle scenes associated with fantasy such as as Jason and the Argonauts. These need to be distinguished. – Joseph Cernik 1 year ago
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Here Today, Gone Tomorrow, and Back Again: Undo-ly Uncharacteristic

Many films have exulted the academic setting to the dismay and delight of old and young. With the advent of online learning environments, how will this transpire in relation to its predecessor? Assuming there is a new trend in the making, it will have to contend with a considerable list of memorable, and possibly unbearable, student experiences. The films that have elevated the story-line being: The Paper Chase, The Social Network, A Beautiful Mind, Good Will Hunting, The Breakfast Club and Grease. The television serials that have captivated the imagination, including: The Facts of Life, Welcome Back Kotter and Room 222. Will any such online vignette bring new challenges to the director, the actor, the setting and the audience; or, will it venture into a boundless territory of possibility and ingenuity? How is the virtual Third Place better or worse than the traditional or customary physical site?

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    Seizing the Audience

    The actor puts on a memorable performance on stage, by television, through radio, in film, and at times even the political or business arena. Shirley Temple started frolicking before the camera at the age of 3 by mesmerizing both young and old with her voice, dance, and then with her diplomacy for the United Nations. In the 1930s, Lucille Ball captured the attention of men, women, and children by her stage debut, modeling exploits, and as a studio executive. Carol Burnett entered the stage in the 1960s and endeared a generation of fans through televised comedy, earning her a Presidential Medal of Freedom for her unique brand of entertainment. Explore these unique facets of showmanship; child actor, slapstick comic that harkens to the burlesque of yore, public persona as a venue beyond conventional female roles, as a transformative mechanism of expression, realization, or determination.

    • This is a fascinating topic. I'm looking for a common thread between these actresses, and curious about what your main thesis/question would be. Is it specifically that these women defied conventional roles for women, and used this defiance of expectations as part of their "act" on stage or in film? How much of that was in their control? Or is it simply the fact that they, as women, being on stage/in films in these roles, defied conventions? Or are they more like case studies for a broader phenomena of women onstage, changing the industry? This is going to be such an exceptional article and I'm very eager to read it! – Eden 3 years ago
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    The Show Must Go On

    The carhop made its debut in the 1920s alongside the advent of the early automobiles. It would been forgotten were it not for having a part in the 1973 film, American Graffiti. The concept quickly evolved from customers who preferred to dine inside their car, to initially male carhops that were later replaced with female carhops in order to increase profits. The Sonic Drive-In restaurant is a return to this novelty of yesteryear. More to the point, cinema has catered to the inclination of many people over time. The earliest attempts involved storefronts that were converted to impromptu movie houses. A motion picture was projected onto a wall for viewers who were charged a pithy entrance fee; hence, the name Nickelodeon. This popular diversion led to larger movie palaces (doubling the entrance fee) due to the demand for more comfortable viewing accommodations when longer shows became the attraction. A pattern that has elevated from the mime street artist, to the flea sideshow that was part of the traveling circus, to the theater. Indeed, the theater itself has undergone a plethora of embellishments in order to dominate its market and to stave the onset of competing technology. It has experimented with silent actors, 3D renditions, Dolby sound, CGI animation, IMAX, to name some of the more popular effects. One cinematic event did create a noteworthy following, for all the hurdles it endured. The drive-in theater required mere open land, a wall, and window-mounted speakers to attract moviegoers. This setting appealed to families, teenagers, and film enthusiasts alike. Relive the nostalgia as well as the monumental challenges (nationally or internationally) that drive-in promoters tolerated in order to deliver the show: inclement weather, night cover restriction, and overall outdoor nuisance in order to mount the ultimate movie experience of that era. Was it a sign of the times, a shift from convention, or an industry in flux?

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      What's in a name?

      Is the verve or is it the persona? How much of an influence does the performer’s name have on the crowd? Would Johnny Cash, Eddie Money, Tom Cruise, River Phoenix, Chris Rock, Paris Hilton be any less fascinating in physical presence alone? Explore the notoriety or the appeal of the name behind the spectacle. Does being a Barrymore, Sheen, Fonda, Howard, or Coppola make something out of nothing? Does Hollywood provide the grit or does the audience induce the alchemy?

      • Some names are catchy, others are not. Does that make a difference in success. A good idea for an article. – Joseph Cernik 3 years ago
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      Policing the Silver Screen

      Much has been debated over what fuels producers, screenwriters, directors, and actors in their quest to deliver the finest storytelling. Yet, one need only to look back a few decades to notice how audience appetite was satisfied with outer space dilemmas or even common, mundane concerns. Clint Eastwood, Michael Douglas, Arnold Schwarzenegger are names that come to mind when retreating back to determine what drove legions of viewers to the silver screen or the television screen. Eastwood and Douglas both acted as the cop on the beat (Dirty Harry and Streets of San Francisco) and eventually starred in roles on the complete opposite side of the law (Escape from Alcatraz and Wall Street), respectively. Schwarzenegger initially capitalized on villainy (Terminator, Conan the Barbarian) and then showed a softer side in Kindergarten Cop as well as other comedic jaunts. Explore the impulse for this effective formula of screenplay, whether at home, abroad, or any distant time or place. On what basis does the actor make the decision to reverse his posture throughout his career or, as is most often the case, venture onto the director chair or embark on political agendas (Ronald Reagan, Shirley Temple)?

      • There is something here that could be good. Focusing on what brings about change regarding, say, a few actors- how they try to adapt or try to remain consistent to their images. – Joseph Cernik 3 years ago
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      Divine Inspiration: The Effect of Spirituality in Acting

      The late 1960s were a time of experimentation with social values and leisure pursuits. Though leading British bands such the Beatles could thrive on their musical talent alone, they opted to explore and embrace the benefits of traditional Eastern teaching, particularly through Transcendental Meditation as professed by the Maharishi Mahesh Yogi of northern India. The band’s creativity and productivity escalated during this point in their career and contributed to the movement against substance abuse and the promotion of Transcendental Meditation into Western audiences. In fact, George Harrison incorporated various aspects of Indian culture into his songwriting and his Hand Made film titles during the late 1970s. His lyrics reflected Hindu principles and were recorded using Indian style instruments. Some of these collaborations appeared during his work with the Beatles but also manifested independently with support of the Hare Krishna movement and an early form of the benefit concert; the 1971 Concert for Bangladesh with Ravi Shankar. Upon his death in 2001, his ashes were spread across the Ganges and Yamuna rivers of India in accordance with Hindu practice. In the same manner, how does an actor’s religious preference permeate into the performance, if not, his private or public life? Some performers to consider: Tom Cruise and his claim that the Church of Scientology helped him overcome dyslexia, Richard Gere practicing Buddhism and his subsequent endorsement of the Dalai Lama, followers of the Kabbalah Centre including notables such as Madonna, Demi Moore, Elizabeth Taylor, and Paris Hilton.

      • This is a very thorough prompt and although I have no depth of knowledge about the artists/creators you mentioned or the theological influence in their work, I would very much be interested in an article about it. – Slaidey 3 years ago
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      • This topic is rich and would yield a very interesting read if taken up by the right columnist or writer. It’s really deep enough for a book— not being one of my pet subjects, I wouldn’t have the time, but surely someone does! Try to include people who’ve incorporated religious practice into their self-help books, like Dan Harris’s “10% Happier.” Not necessarily people trying to proselytize, but those offering legitimate advice based upon what practices truly helped them. – Andantemaestroso 3 years ago
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      Theatrics of Cooking

      Does a TV chef’s professional profile (author, entrepreneur, sponsor, connoisseur) exclusively contribute to the show or does the food selection, recipe delivery, or recording location dominate the screen and the script? Consider the fame and background of celebrities that cater to the palette through TV, radio, book, or film: Martha Stewart, Nigella Lawson, Julia Child, and Rachael Ray.

      • This sounds like it would make an interesting to read. Focusing in on several different chefs and how they have presented themselves. Say, Graham Kerr contrasted with Julia Child and whether it matters whatever it is they are preparing because their personalities may matter more than the food. – Joseph Cernik 3 years ago
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      • I think it's all of the above but a lot of the theatrics of cooking shows come from relatability of cooking. – samschroe 3 years ago
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      • I think a lot that goes into the portrayal of a TV chef is the stories they tell as they're preparing food. Most TV chef's have a conversational, easygoing, and relatable way of talking. It's all about how they deliver themselves to the viewer. I think what's also important is how they make cooking appear something that the viewer can also replicate in his or her own kitchen. They make cooking something that isn't super over complicated but something entertaining to watch and learn from. – jay 3 years ago
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      The Family That Performs Together

      Does being part of an acting family detract from individual performance? Or does the family dynamic contribute to the development of the character in ways not otherwise possible? Is the acting a product of the individual drawing from early formative experience or from a constant effort to avoid it and seek a unique path to stardom? Consider the dilemma or the benefit using famous Hollywood families such as Martin Sheen, Drew Barrymore, Kirk Douglas, Henry Fonda, and Julia Roberts.

      • Breaking away from the Hollywood-centric theme of this suggestion could produce some interesting results, such as: Armendáriz-Marín (Mexican), Asher (British), Banai (Israeli), Depardieu (French), Fox-Richardson-Redgraves (British), Gleeson (Irish), just to name a few.Good topic suggestion anyway. – Amyus 4 years ago
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      • In the past, a baker's son would become a baker, and a candlestick maker's offspring would be stuck with waxing the wick. The same with actors. When you grow up in a certain world, you learn the vocabulary and the ins and outs. You also get the connections. And the populace's embrace. Why else would Clint Eastwood's son be acting and Stallone's kids be models? Name recognition. – brandonjudell 4 years ago
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      • Don't forget about the Von Trapp family (the real ones). I find them a good fit for this topic. They were somewhat forced to hone their singing talent so they could have the financial means to live through an economic collapse and escape Nazi Europe, and those stakes arguably followed the whole family throughout their American musical career. Maria's eldest biological daughter Rosmarie actually had a nervous breakdown once, partially because Maria did not approve of her leaving the group. I'd love to see the Von Trapps included here. – Stephanie M. 4 years ago
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      Props That Dominate The Screen

      Why do films with a car as the main attraction appeal to the audience as much as films with human actors? How does screenings such as Herbie, Christine, Knight Rider, or Smokey and the Bandit compare to established portrayals such as Star Wars, Star Trek, or Terminator in that cinematic rendition? Consider the same effect that animals have on the audience; Lassie, Grizzly Adams, and Mister Ed.

      • Part of this could be the discussion of iconography such as the Star Trek uniform symbol or any of the superhero symbols. I think key props may do the same job psychologically that iconography in real life does. – SaraiMW 4 years ago
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      • Ah, interesting! Consider delving into how these inanimate characters or animals are often humanized to connect with the audience. – Stephanie M. 4 years ago
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      Comedy: Internal Energy or External Motivation

      John Belushi was a comedic talent above and beyond the ever constant flow of aspiring young actors. His antics were delivered with masterful ability in both television and film. His contribution to comedy, acting, and singing set the image for future actors to emulate. So, is it safe to say that Chris Farley was merely following the mold set by others or that he added his own specific brand of skill to a familiar venue? Consider the factors that play into developing the unique performer, while simultaneously pointing out the distinctive traits of the personality. Does comedic talent necessitate a lesser or more pronounced counterpart, much like Laurel and Hardy in order to cultivate the creative juices? How much of an effect does audience have on delivery and captivating tension? Are props, musical score, setting, and dialogue vital to the production or simple accessories of the process? Does the climactic spectacle require a "Who’s on first?" dialogue as the one coined by Abbott and Costello, or is it merely the chemistry between the characters?

      • I feel like you are in need of a stupid and futile gesture. – nolarmade69 4 years ago
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      The Acting Dilemma: Limited Resource or Bountiful Influence

      Does physical presence primarily carry the screen character, or does the dialogue and script or director and cast influence the dramatic effect behind entertainment? In the process of this consideration, explore classic one-liners instituted by Mae West burlesque sketches in film and song. Among the other possible directions to elaborate, television greats such Jackie Gleason of The Honeymooners fame and his nonstop banter against his wife, his neighbor, and the slew of supporting roles displayed in a variety of episodes. This point can be expanded to other genres or periods such as: the Clint Eastwood 1970s role of Dirty Harry or the snide remarks of Arnold Schwarzenegger in the Terminator series.

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        John Lennon: Singular Talent Or Group Dynamic

        Was John Lennon a multi-talented individual or did his success arise from a mixture of personal and professional acquaintances, geographical destinations, life experiences, or generational appetite? Examine the events leading to his early struggles as a fledgling art student, to the final years of masterful composing in order to isolate and understand the potent recipe for musical ascendancy.

        • Interesting idea. I lean toward Lennon being a singular talent. He obviously benefited from his band mates in the '60s, but his solo material subsequently is quite wonderful. I think you could make a compelling argument for either side of this issue. – John Wilson 4 years ago
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        • Maybe worth considering: It seems like he had most of his eccentricities and strange musical proclivities ironed out by the Lennon-McCarntey song writing machine and producer GeorgeMartin. – DeanJr 4 years ago
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        The Early Formation Of The Child Performer

        Modern performances rely on young actors amid outlandish worlds of fantasy and fable. It is often conveyed through technological devices such as computer graphics or scale mock-ups. But years ago, child performers had only their voice, their dancing feet, their counterpart, and a reliable stream of antics to deliver entertainment to audiences. In the tradition of Shirley Temple and Little Rascals, show how much or how little technological advancement in screenplay has impacted the burgeoning and maturing actor into a unique form or into a rambunctious version of the original model. By all means, incorporate relevant patterns of the genre by configuring actors such as Mickey Rooney (who started in silent film) into the prose, or the Brooke Shields foray into fashion, modeling, and advertising.

        • Relevant article: https://the-artifice.com/secret-life-of-shirley-temple/ – Misagh 4 years ago
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        • An interesting suggestion for an article! There's a great history of cinema to draw upon indeed, but might I also suggest widening the subject to include a look at young actors/actresses' development outside of Hollywood? – Amyus 4 years ago
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        • A lovely topic with plenty of research to draw from. I'd be especially interested in the writer's take on Shirley Temple. Both my grandmas had some of her movies, so I watched her as a kid. I liked her, but even when I was little I felt her acting was overdone and whiny. I wonder now if that was encouraged because of a lack of technology, or if today's child stars have similar problems. (Personally, I've seen some really good ones and some that can't act to save their little lives). – Stephanie M. 4 years ago
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        The Impact of Effects on Performance

        The early silent films of Charlie Chaplin were masterpieces of entertainment. Yet, there was little to no soundtrack nor color. Even before that, audiences had to rely primarily on imagination in order to bring to life the voice-based scripts of radio. Since those initial attempts at conveying plot, a riveting account of history can be equally transformed by song and choreography, such as in Evita (1996) starring Madonna. For this matter, explore the requirement of prop and effect in adding to the effectiveness or detracting from the quality of film or television.

        • Now this could make for a fascinating article indeed! Might I also suggest including other silent greats such as Buster Keaton, Harold Lloyd and similar? It would be also be worth mentioning the role that the accompanying pianist had in helping to create mood for these early cinematic audiences/viewers. With regard to voice based scripts on radio, I once worked with a chap who gave me a fascinating insight into some of the everyday 'found' objects that were used to add audio effects. I'll never look at a sink plunger in the same way again! The Foley artist is a valued and essential part of film making these days, especially when, in some instances, up to 90% of dialogue and sounds effects are recreated after the shoot has actually finished. Having done ADR (Additional Dialogue Recording) myself I can certainly attest to how tough it can be for the actor to recreate the mood and emotion, sometimes months later, of the original performance. Props can be a boon to any performer, if used well, but they can also be a right pain in the backside if poorly maintained and will detract from a performance. Every actor has his or her horror stories about props that seem to take on a life of their own. Thumbs up from me and good luck to he or she who takes on this subject. – Amyus 4 years ago
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        Michael Douglas: Keeping the Audience Reeling

        The actor Michael Douglas graduated from University of California at Santa Barbara with a degree in Drama. The real work began after an impressive portfolio of film and television roles: The Streets of San Francisco, The China Syndrome, Romancing the Stone, Fatal Attraction, Basic Instinct, Black Rain, The American President, Wall Street, and The War of the Roses. He has played: detective, banker, lawyer, reporter; in both an acting capacity and as director. As if that wasn’t enough to qualify on your own merits, he is the son of famed Hollywood thespian, Kirk Douglas. But, success has no limits and Michael Douglas is proof that the territory of theater is his dominion. It is no surprise then that the University of St. Andrews in Scotland bestowed upon him an honorary Doctor of Letters degree in 2006. With a vibrant history of contribution to the arts, one must wonder–what was the allure that kept audiences flocking to the theaters and Hollywood studios beckoning with scripts? One avenue to explore could be the pressure the character has to deal with in front of the camera; crime, career, colleagues, addiction, moderation, or marriage. Who holds the key to a great performance: the scriptwriter, the actor, the circumstance, or the foil? In what way does Douglas figure against seasoned counterparts, gender-ethnic based peers, or immediate audience? Is it a matter of how willing and able the actor is to crossing boundaries (cultural, professional, geographical, personal, ideological) for the sake of the film industry, even if merely for the art? Consider this common thread of crossing material and metaphysical boundaries in the analysis.

        • Website http://www.seofreetips.net/blog Business Email admin@seofreetips.net About Me:- I am Internet marketer, blogger and social media expert I share my knowledge about SEO at seofreetips.net Ask me any question related to SEO, Link Building and Online Money making. FB Profile: - https://www.facebook.com/seo457 Twitter:- https://twitter.com/nekrajb1 Google Plus https://plus.google.com/+NekrajBhartiyaBoss Intagram https://instagram.com/nekrajB Wordpress https://bloggingtoolreview.wordpress.com/ Tumblr http://seofreetips.tumblr.com/ Youtube https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCVGxDRvKsxhwptSqQ8ALPbQ Pinterest https://pinterest.com/nekrajbhartiya LinkedIn https://www.linkedin.com/in/nekraj-bhartiya-74a4b7112/ – seofreetips 4 years ago
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        Reincarnation and Cloning: Old and New Forms of Existence

        Is eternity encoded in the human DNA and, if so, is cloning overkill or counter-intuitive? In ancient Celtic lore, a warrior sword was cast away onto a body of water upon his untimely or unjust death, to symbolize his promotion to the next level of consciousness. If the human soul is in fact transient, is it more conducive to comprehend its boundaries, its depths, or its mechanism and, as such, infuse life with a honed purpose and a more enlightened experience? Is the 1997 Heaven’s Gate incident an emerging (and legitimate) human alternative?

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          The Constant Quest For Immortality

          In 1818, the theme of immortality was considered by novelist Mary Shelley. Today, science has nurtured the desire to prolong life, with Cryonics. In between, the film industry thrives on the possibility of advanced human existence. From the earliest civilizations, the theme of longevity has been pursued and immortalized in monumental structures, lore, and ritual. A variety of human achievements can be traced from these contributions to reveal a long-standing preoccupation with thwarting the inevitable termination of life.

          • I just was rereading Frankenstein! It is an amazing piece of writing and the themes of the story translate incredibly well to discussion about modern science and technology as they related to life and death. I would love to see some dive deep into this topic, it would make for an exciting and fascinating article. – SeanGadus 5 years ago
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          • Already written, just waiting for more audience reaction, and for the Pending Review to open the gate, so to speak. Be on the look out, it won't disappoint, lots of food for though. – lofreire 5 years ago
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          • This is one of the broadest topics I've come across. So fascinating, because you could apply it to a whole hosts of works - but where would it end? (no pun intended!) – Luke Stephenson 5 years ago
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