Television

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Will cable TV die in the next 10 or more years?

With the advent of online streaming services, is the television platform nearing its end? If so, how much longer can the platform last? If this topic was picked, the writer could research evidence leading to the conclusion that TV will die out soon or if it still has many years left to go.

  • I think that is a very strong possibility. – AGMacdonald 3 months ago
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  • There's been speculation that this could happen--but only if there are not so many competitors for streaming. With Twitter and Facebook livestreams, each channel (and Disney) getting their "go" on, Hulu, Amazon Prime, and Netflix completing with content, and so on, customers may be disgusted and just pirate, or have large groups to share the services. – IndiLeigh 3 months ago
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  • With the death of television I'm seeing an emergence of broadcast streams. The appeal of tv for the older generations was in part that they don't have to think about or choose what they're watching-- Just put on your favourite channel and sit down. Reruns are fine, and it's a god way to get introduced to movies they might have otherwise not given a chance. I can see specific tv channels turning into company hosted streams, perfect for mindless entertainment when you don't feel like paying attention. – Slaidey 2 weeks ago
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The Fall of Calm, Cool, and Collected and the Rise of the Flawed Hero

While watching re-runs of the 1960s cult classic, The Avengers, I was reminded of the effortless cool of many of that era’s heroes. With their witty banter and impeccable fashion sense, John Steed and Emma Peel were the epitome of the clever and effortlessly cool hero. Sean Connery as James Bond, the ever-jaded Humphrey Bogart, and even Cary Grant with his many aliases in the comic film Charade all exuded debonair qualities. Nowadays, many audiences gravitate toward anti-heroes instead. We are all about gritty realism, whether that’s by casting non-celebrity faces with minimal if any make-up as in Orange is the New Black, showing explicit content as in Game of Thrones or The Walking Dead, or simply having skewed morals as in House of Cards or Dexter. There are even heroes who revoke the traditional heroism thrust upon them as with Jessica Jones. Modern-day protagonists are not often meant to be looked up to, but humanly flawed and as susceptible to be corrupted as we are. Yet it goes even beyond mere human flaws. It seems we enjoy seeing the extremes of bad behavior and the worst versions of ourselves. How did this come about? Is there a way to attain gritty realism without sacrificing the self-assuredness of the supposed heroes?

  • Great topic. I think there's an groundswell begging the return of standard heroes, not that antiheroes will disappear. – Tigey 1 year ago
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  • In terms of how it came to be, talk about how relatable these anti-heros are to real life people and situations. Relatability goes a long way in modern day film, because people are more accepting of how these old "heros" are not exactly the most realistic, and find the anti-hero more exciting. Incorporate why this has changed over the years. – Deana Murphy 1 year ago
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Can TV make you into a murderer?

Look into the psychological effects of modern television and see if there is any scientific evidence to suggest if TV can influence human behavior, and if so then to what degree and in what ways.

  • Sounds fascinating and terrifying in equal measure. – J.P. Shiel 2 years ago
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  • There are two ways it can go. The first is to experience the trauma from the safety of your armchair, similar to reading. An example of a positive outcome would be the classic Disney cartoon in which separation from parental units are regularly depicted like Bambi, Jungle Book and Cinderella. The second direction is that regularly watching horrific scenes causes desensitization. So I agree with J. P. Shield that it is fascinating and terrifying simultaneously. – Munjeera 2 years ago
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  • I've always answered this in the same way as when someone begs the same question of video games. I find that it can be an enhancer for people who are already on unfortunate paths but it cannot be what initiates the affect. I'd love to know if there are any studies with findings on the subject. – TGoutos 2 years ago
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  • Interesting... Well if an individual is unstable to start with, even if unknown, it may trigger something on the inside. I wonder if children could be sensitive too this... It would be interesting to find out. – FandomCrasher 2 years ago
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  • I believe there has not been a scientific study that proves this one way or another but that being said, we all have to watch and limit the exposure of violence on TV on our children. While I do not believe a child would become a murderer by watching TV, it will certainly give those ideas or motivation that are more susceptible to manipulation or those that already have some sort of a chemical imbalance that might push them towards that path. It is the whole theory of nurture versus nature I guess. In so many cases, theorist have gone one way or another and it is still a much debated theory. – ferozan 2 years ago
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  • There have already been studies about this. The subject would have to be narrowed down more in order to be tackled in anything that wasn't a huge book. Maybe focus in generically (dramas, crime dramas, what have you) – darcvader 2 years ago
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  • Being someone who is totally empathetic, there's a lot of truth to this. I'm moved by just about anything that I watch on TV. Once Upon a Time makes me lovey dovey, Sons of Anarchy made me pray for violence against other characters. It's the strangest thing. – Karyn Little 2 years ago
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  • I would kill to read this article. – Tigey 1 year ago
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  • There have been several movies that depict a murder/crime that resembles a story from a book. One example that comes to mind is "The Raven". Whoever chooses this article could talk about the influences of both TV and books. – JennyCardinal 1 year ago
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  • There are no definitive experimental studies that uphold this notion; all that exists are correlations between television viewing and individuals who become murderers. Nature versus Nurture needs to be factored into this equation. Television alone cannot make someone a sociopath, but it can definitely give an unbalanced individual ideas as to how to extract their image of terror on the public. – danielle577 1 year ago
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LGBT Stereotyping in TV

Analyze the use of LGBT stereotypes in TV, asking whether they serve to help the LGBT community by raising awareness, or do more damage by perpetuating stereotypes. Ideas: the "Gay Best Friend", the "Butch" lesbian, etc.

  • LGBT stereotyping in anime also seems like an interesting topic to tackle. – smarrie 2 years ago
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  • Definitely a good one to do. I broached that a little on my site (http://mattdoylemedia.com/2015/09/23/article-bi-visibility-day-2015-and-my-writing/) with regards to Bi Stereotyping. Popular entertainment has so much power with this I think. Anime/Manga is no different to Western entertainment in that respect. – mattdoylemedia 2 years ago
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  • This is a good topic. Just like any other stereotype (i.e. the "dumb blond," "the nerd"), LGTB stereotyping can be overused and make a character seem bland. Having a character be the "gay best friend" may be a good foundation for a character, but the character must be written to have a unique personality, otherwise he or she will just be a bland character that doesn't help raise awareness for the LGTB community. – valiantreader 2 years ago
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Theatrical vs. Televised Animation

Are there any theatrical animation studios who you thought did better work when they transitioned to television in the 1950s and ’60s, whether for weekend cartoons or television commercials? If so, which ones and why? For example, how does THE BUGS BUNNY SHOW of 1960 compare to the Warner Brothers theatrical cartoons of 1960? How do Terrytoons’ television commercials for Piels Beer in 1957 compare to the studio’s theatrical cartoons of 1957? How does the DISNEYLAND tv show compare to Disney’s theatrical shorts of the 1950s? How do Paramount’s tv cartoons for King Features Syndicate between 1960 and 1961 compare to its theatrical work of the period?

  • Are you raising this question because you want to know which studio had better animation on television compared to others, or better concepts and stories? Because a misconception to be aware about is that most television animation is outsourced to 3rd party companies who work by contract. And so while I think it has been obvious that back in the 1980s and 1990s, Disney had the strongest and most successful tv presence along-side their theatrical productions, most if not all of their tv work was outsourced to Japan and Taiwan. They contracted a fantastic Japanese studio named Tokyo Movie Shinsha (TMS), to create the first season of "Ducktales," "Chip & Dale Rescue Rangers," and the entire short lived series "The Gummie Bears." They also animated the first season of "Inspector Gadget" for DiC. But after those initial seasons, the animation quality dips off quite a bit, because Wang Film Productions began taking over as the sole studio, until periodically, you'll see much more expressive and skillful work by Disney's Austrailian Branch pop in here and there, especially with the show, "Timone & Pumba." So basically, you need to be more clear about what you're really trying to get at with this question, and what you expect people to be researching and talking about when they write this article. – Jonathan Leiter 2 years ago
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  • Thanks. I'm talking about theatrical studios that produced for television while still making theatrical cartoons. For example, how does THE BUGS BUNNY SHOW of 1960 compare to the Warner Brothers theatrical cartoons of 1960? How do Terrytoons' television commercials for Piels Beer in 1957 compare to the studio's theatrical cartoons of 1957? How does the DISNEYLAND tv show compare to Disney's theatrical shorts of the 1950s? How do Paramount's tv cartoons for King Features Syndicate between 1960 and 1961 compare to its theatrical work of the period? – drchrisp 2 years ago
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  • Okay, then you MUST state that you are talking about a TV presence from that era. Because when I read this, I thought you were referring to things like Dreamworks making films like "Kung Fu Panda," "How to Train Your Dragon," and "Madagascar," and then creating TV shows based on those properties. Or Disney making "Aladdin," "The Little Mermaid," and "The Lion King," and making TV shows based on those, as well as any other original series that followed along-side. Being that you want to talk far more specifically about a time in early television when these studios were still doing all of their animation "in-house"--which allows for a much more reasonable and accurate comparison--you should make the time period very clear in your topic description. – Jonathan Leiter 2 years ago
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The 21st Century: The Rise of TV and the Decline of Film

TV series have presented bold storytelling and characters within the last two decades. The advent of Netflix, Amazon, and other web-based streaming networks have further taken "TV programming" to new heights of artistic expression and creative topics. Even though Reality Shows dominate many stations, fictional series continue to capture audiences’ imaginations.

While TV is experiencing a renaissance, the film industry is suffering from an obsession for reboots, adaptations, and re-imaginings. What are the factors that are contributing to this shift, given how film critics and audiences viewed film as the higher art form during much of the 20th century? Possible shows to discuss: Netflix’s "House of Cards" (since it is an adaptation).

In fact, many popular 70s shows were adaptations from British TV ("Three’s Company," "Sanford & Son," "All in the Family). Are there really more innovative shows today? "Orange Is the New Black," "Game of Thrones," "Forever," "Transparent," "Comedy Bang! Bang!" "Time and Eric" could be useful shows to discuss. Modern TV certainly has its share of adaptations and reboots: "Flash," "Once Upon a Time," and "Game of Thrones," being three, yet critics and audiences are viewing them as innovative, while the live-action Disney productions, for example, are not as well-regarded. With R-rated movies becoming a novelty rather than a regularity, film has lost its edge over TV for many reasons.

  • You should definitely think about talking about the way in which the style of how we watch TV shows has changed. This is a huge contributing factor why tv shows have increased. Talk about... The main corporations that control the broadcasting stations or networks and how they first introduced marathons that would broadcast back to back epsidoes of a show. Then the rise of Netflix and how we watch shows alone now compared to the time where we gathered around the TV as a family to watch a good movie. There are many scholarly articles on this if you wanted to look some up. – Meaganryelle 2 years ago
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  • You should definitely think about talking about the way in which the style of how we watch TV shows has changed. This is a huge contributing factor why tv shows have increased. Talk about... The main corporations that control the broadcasting stations or networks and how they first introduced marathons that would broadcast back to back epsidoes of a show. Then the rise of Netflix and how we watch shows alone now compared to the time where we gathered around the TV as a family to watch a good movie. There are many scholarly articles on this if you wanted to look some up. – Meaganryelle 2 years ago
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Television: has it become too predictable?

In television, most notably today, Fall premieres of "new" shows find themselves falling into almost predictable patterns: overly dramatic music clues the viewer to get ready, some important memory trigger is interrupted by something "suddenly" happening, etc. Have we come to a point where television has become lazy in delivery, instead relying on tropes it knows will work? Or have we just seen it all? Is there really anything that could be considered "new" television? Or is all television simply a collection of story lines that get revamps via setting, character, etc.?

  • Live-action dramas fall into these cliched and predictable cues because of how they are produced, and the audiences that typically watch them. So it is indeed a topic which must be explored further to understand why it might happen. Animated shows, however, do not have these same issues. Plenty of animated series still fail to impress due to bottom of the barrel humor, and often completely unexplainable premises. But quite a few stand as some of the best examples of creative storytelling and character development on television today, and should not be discounted when discussing this particular topic. Perhaps at least a disclaimer somewhere in the opening paragraphs just to make sure they are given their due. – FilmmakerJ 2 years ago
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Audience Agency in Postmodern Television

Audience agency refers to the act and quantity of which the audience of a particular art piece attempt connection with both the artistic piece and its artist. In this case, examine the audience agency in regards to postmodern television. Examine cases such as television series being renewed through audience engagement, or a television series that changed plotlines or characters because of audience approval/disapproval. Discuss whether this degree of agency is good for the future of television or not.