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Chauvinism in Comics Fandom

While there are an ever-increasing amount of female readers/fans in the world of comics and superheroes, there also seems to be a never-ending supply of chauvinist fans who respond to titles such as Ms. Marvel or Batgirl with hostility, often using such charming phrases as "what is this feminist bullshit?" to describe their feelings. In a medium already hyper masculinized what does this behaviour suggest about comics fandom and its audience?
Maybe also mention attitude toward female cosplayers, creators, and characters.

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    When Western Style Superheroes Appear in Manga

    It’s a truism that in manga that there are manga suited to every topic and influence, from playing on a basketball team to the biography of Buddha or Adolf Hitler to manga about preparing food and drinking wine. But one subject area that doesn’t seem to thrive in manga is Western style superheroes, at least not in the translated market. The closest analogue to Western superhero comics is the comic MAIL, which was a pretty successful iteration of the supernatural-mystery format seen variously in books like Dr Strange or Constantine. But the book didn’t last very long, concluding after just three volumes. A manga like One-Punch Man feels more like a satire of conventional Western superhero comics. Is it that these comics don’t exist in either country, or is it that they simply don’t succeed in the US direct market because of competition from existing superhero properties? Or is there another, less obvious reason why Japanese superhero comics haven’t succeeded in the US market?

    • My Hero Academia is a popular anime that has been noticeably influenced by Western superheroes. One of the main protagonists even bears a striking resemblance to Captain America. – ees 3 years ago
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    Overweight Superheroes

    Is lean and muscular the only physiological type for a superhero? Are there overweight superheroes? What does this say about our concept of heroes? Is there a need for different body types as heroes?

    • could also talk about the plus-sized superhero named Faith, who recently has come out with a comic - and what that shows for the future of comics and how we are broadened into a way to show different physiological superheroes. – scole 5 years ago
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    • See, the amount of strength required to perform heroics need to reflect what the viewers believe to be the ideal body type for such strenuous actions.Here's an example that might be on the extreme side: You have three guys. One is morbidly obese, one is anorexic, and one is average built. You ask all three of them to lift at least 50 pounds worth of baggage with one hand only. Who do you think can lift the 50 pounds without the problem? The morbidly obese guy who look like he could have a heart attack any moment? The anorexic guy who look like the wind can blow him away? Or the average built guy who hasn't been to the gym but eats a balanced meal every day?Yes, there are cases when a person is deceptively strong even if he/she doesn't show much muscle. But if you are specifically looking for the anatomical errors, you can look up the infamous Captain America's torso portion or Spider-Woman's pose on comic book covers. – ADYang 5 years ago
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    • Even if an argument is made about "realism," it's worth noting the large diversity among people who are "in shape" (there was a photo floating around the Internet a while ago highlighting the different body types of Olympic athletes that seems relevant.) Heroes today are drawn with extremely defined muscles, and that level of leanness is rarely healthy, and not really necessary for a hero defined by strength. There's also a trend of making characters with entirely non-physical abilities extremely muscular; check our how Magneto looks in the comics. – bbctol 5 years ago
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    • Wow, I've never before thought of this. Anyone wanting to write on this should not forget Mr. Incredible!! – Tony13 5 years ago
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    • I think the hardest part to get such a super hero popularized in the franchise is that none already exist and those who flock to the new marvel movies etc. are doing so for childhood memories. Even Hulk and The Thing aren't plus sized, they are just hugely muscular. The only memory I have is of a (literally) obese x-men mutant from a tv show who was a bad guy. Will the best way to approach introducing a plus sized be to create a new one or re-shape (punny) an older hero? With all the current gender bending and race changing going on in current Marvel movies would this be acceptable? – Slaidey 5 years ago
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    • When I offered this topic, I was thinking on my days of playing D&D, and that there was a role for every Archetype, and each archetype had a stereotypic body type. The thin "anorexic" wizard, the paunchy "obese" clerical healer, the muscular warrior, etc. Each body type was honored as having a particular strength within the context of group work. When I looked at comic superheroes, yes they do have superhero groups, but they almost all have the muscular body type. – DrTestani 5 years ago
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    The Cultural Indication of 'The Superhero'

    Marvel, and to a lesser extent DC, have taken the film (and slowly the television industry) by storm. What do superhero movies do for us, and why do we like them so much? Flashback to the early 2000s and we see the germination of the modern superhero film; flashback further and the way in which the superhero film was culturally received varied wildly from how it is today.

    Are superhero movies, now, a mock resurgence of patriotism in the face of an ever dwindling sense of privacy? Perhaps we create these larger than life characters in order to find some of ourselves in them; we look to Captain America and Iron Man and see the individual as supreme. The ever powerful individual has the means of affecting global change himself and needs to truly fear no one. Are Americans totally ensnared by this fantastical creation — and most importantly, if they are, is this a good thing? Is it okay for this to go unspoken and unrealized or is our affair with the superhero a rationalization of deeper fears we’d rather not confront?

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    The Continued Rise of Superhero Shows

    With Arrow, The Flash, Supergirl and Agents of SHIELD currently on the air and with more in development, analyze what is making the superhero genre attractive for TV. Discuss the difference in viewers between shows and networks and if that is a hindrance to some of the programs.

    • I think Daredevil is the perfect example of a superhero show because it doesn't/hasn't yet overcomplicated things by trying to merge with other series' plotlines. I am finding it difficult to muster enthusiasm to get into Arrow, The Flash etc. because it just seems such a hefty commitment. – CalvinLaw 5 years ago
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    • i completely agree with the above comment, i watch them all, but you have to start from the beginning or else you'll probably be lost. the flash and arrow are huge commitments! also, Gotham you can't forget about Gotham. That show is marvelous, and really proves what a really good superhero show can do. – scoleman 5 years ago
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    • I think that this is a good topic. To elaborate on what could be discussed, I think it would also be interesting to hear if the crossovers between shows would be ideal and encouraged. If so, should the networks do them more often? One of the shows on the rise is Legends of Tomorrow, which from my understanding is almost entirely taking characters from Flash and Arrow and combining them into a team. Good or bad idea? – Danny Phantom 5 years ago
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    • One thing that I like about superhero shows is the antihero. For example, Oliver Queen. He's not your typical, do-good superhero we often see. He's willing to kill people if it comes to it, something not every superhero is okay with. I like the darker side of superheroes. Another new superhero show that's taken over is Jessica Jones. She's also not your traditional hero and she's a badass. The show is dark yet the plot isn't over complicated and easy to follow along. You're always rooting for her. Gotham is another good show, also. – diehlsam 5 years ago
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